Science for Sustaining the World’s Forests

The 2014 IUFRO Scientific Achievement Awards

Scientific Achievement Award winners, from left to right:  Shibu Jose, Aino A. Mäkelä-Carter, Sally Aitken, Robert Kozak, Jürgen Bauhus, Christopher Harwood, Richard Hamelin, and Guisseppe Scarascia Mugnozza. Not pictured: Jolanda Roux.
Scientific Achievement Award winners, from left to right: Shibu Jose, Aino A. Mäkelä-Carter, Sally Aitken, Robert Kozak, Jürgen Bauhus, Christopher Harwood, Richard Hamelin, and Guisseppe Scarascia Mugnozza. Not pictured: Jolanda Roux.

 

IUFRO presents the Scientific Achievement Awards for outstanding research published in scientific journals, proceedings of scientific meetings, books, appropriate patents or other achievements important to the advancement of regional or world forestry or forestry research.

Shirong Liu, Chairman of the IUFRO Honors and Awards Committee, announced this year’s award winners at the Opening Ceremony:

Sally Aitkin (Canada) ties original and creative research to issues such as the adaptation of natural tree populations to their local environments that have important social and economic implications both in western Canada and worldwide. Her AdapTree genomics project links new developments in genomics with climate modeling, evolutionary biology, and economic analysis.

Jürgen Bauhus (Germany) conducts silvicultural research on the relationships between forest structure, composition and function, both above and below ground, with important contributions to the understanding of native, semi-natural, and plantation forests.

Benjamin Cashore (USA/Canada), a preeminent scholar in forest governance and policy, has, through his studies, illuminated the symbiotic roles of government and business in bringing about solutions to some of the most difficult problems facing forestry and the environment today, including illegal logging, the degradation of tropical forests, and the impacts of climate change.

Richard Hamelin (Canada) is a pioneer in the field of molecular forest pathology, where his innovations in integrating molecular biology and genomics into forest pathology to answer questions related to pathogen detection and monitoring, population dynamics, and ecology have resulted in molecular tools important to monitoring and analyzing forest pathogens.

Christopher Eric Harwood’s (Australia) significant long-term research addresses the ecology, genetics, breeding, plantation deployment, and wood utilization of the Australian tree species acacia, eucalyptus, and Grevillea robusta, advancing the understanding of the science that underpins successful tree breeding in the tropics and benefiting tree growers.

Shibu Jose’s (USA) research helps address ecological sustainability challenges of forested ecosystems at local, national, and international levels. He examines how resource availability (e.g., light, water, nutrients, carbon) and disturbances influence ecosystem structure and function in natural forests, short-rotation plantation forests, and agroforests.

Robert A. Kozak (Canada) has helped create a “new wave” of business research within the forestry domain which focuses on conservation-based business management practices that promote sustainability of our global forest resources. His extensive publications and presentations address topics ranging from value-added wood products and supply chain management to poverty alleviation.

Aino A. Mäkelä-Carter (Finland), whose research involves modeling eco-physiological processes and growth of trees and stands, is best known for her pioneering work in dynamic models that translate material balances and structural models of trees into information and forecasts that are useful to both the research and forest management communities.

Jolanda Roux (South Africa), an expert on fungal diseases of trees on the African continent, creates huge impact by sharing her scientific expertise in consultations on tree health problems in technologically deprived regions of Africa, with consultations in Kenya, Ghana, Congo, Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia and Madagascar. Her work in these areas has included diagnosis of tree health problems both in commercial plantation forests and in biologically sensitive and endangered forests.

Guisseppe Scarascia Mugnozza’s (Italy) work at the leading edge of forest science focuses on understanding the effects of climate change on the forest environment. He developed new methods for exposing whole trees to elevated atmospheric CO2, pioneering ecosystem-level assessment of forest productivity and carbon sequestration by eddy covariance. Mugnozza helped start the first eddy flux experiment and establish networks in Europe and worldwide.

Read more about the award winners in the August 14 issue of IUFRO News.

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